Small town trailhead

Small towns are a nice break from the city. I like how universal the desire is for coffee shops, cafes and such. It’s like the city minus visible impoverishment and music venues. I met a friend who lives in that area for breakfast. She had to start work afterwards.

The drive out: just continue straight toward that fire, and the mountain will be on your right. Actually though, I didn’t go that far east.

After breakfast, I explored some trails along Lacamas Creek and Round Lake. What a jewel this place is. The Sat. morning “crowd” was too small to really qualify as one. Happy dogs and people, plus mountain biking trails and a couple of riders. I reached one nice creek crossing:

I was reminded that I also have friends who live in this drainage, miles upstream along wetlands.

It seems no matter what town I’m in, whether in the US or out of country, the same basic desires that are apparent. Food, drink, coffee, socializing, and time outdoors — and of course also shelter. But in a social or connection sense, mainly first five. Everywhere I’ve been outside the US has been westernized though (my travel has been limited), at least to some extent. I just don’t know where the line is between traits of non-western and western cultures. I think because much of the two culture styles is based on common or universal needs like food, water, time in nature, and social connection. Each component is then weaved into a culture. Maybe the weaving style is where the difference lies between western and non-western. Or maybe listing the two culture styles is a false dichotomy and omits the full spectrum.

I took no pictures of the town, Camas, for some reason while walking its downtown on the way to the trailhead. But here is the creek crossing again:

I must return here, with the same breakfast friend, as we’re both mountain bikers.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s